Andrássy Avenue (Andrássy Út)
Andrássy Avenue (Andrássy Út)

Andrássy Avenue (Andrássy Út)

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Andrássy Avenue, Budapest

The basics

Andrássy Avenue was central to Budapest's rapid development in the 1870s, when it evolved into a metropolis. Today, the street serves as a time capsule of sorts, reflecting turn-of-the-century urbanism. In 2002, Andrássy Avenue was recognized for its cultural significance and added to Budapest's UNESCO World Heritage Site designation.

The street is best explored on foot from Elizabeth Square (Erzsébet Tér) to City Park (Városliget). The 1.5-mile (2.5-kilometer) stroll takes about 45-minutes. Don’t miss the luxury stores around Oktogon, the neo-renaissance Hungarian State Opera House, and the fantastic cafés along Liszt Ferenc Square (Liszt Ferenc Tér).

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Things to know before you go

  • Expect to visit Andrássy Avenue whether you plan or not; most tours stop nearby, and several top city attractions are on the storied street.
  • Wear comfy shoes. Andrássy ends at City Park, and it's best to explore both on foot.
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How to get there

The most scenic way to experience Andrássy Avenue is on foot, though the metro is also convenient. The Millennium Underground Railway is both a turn-of-the-century relic and a hassle-free way to travel up and down Andrássy. Sightseeing, bike, and Segway tours usually include stops on Andrássy. Hop-on hop-off bus tours offer the most flexibility.

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When to get there

There's really no bad time to visit, though winter in Budapest is typically chilly and gray, while spring and fall bring clear skies. Shopping is great during the day, while most night bus tours feature the street’s illuminated art deco buildings. Elizabeth Square and Oktagon are often bustling, though the crowds are thinner during mornings.

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Where to uncover Hungarian history

The House of Terror Museum (Terror Háza Múzeum) is situated in a building that once housed the secret police, and the far-right Arrow Cross Party. Unsurprisingly, it’s dedicated to exploring some of the darkest moments in Hungary's history. Visit to learn about communism, fascism, the world wars, terrors of the gulag, and resistance fighters. The museum is open six days a week, and closes on Mondays.

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