National Center for Civil and Human Rights
National Center for Civil and Human Rights

National Center for Civil and Human Rights

100 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd. NW, Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, 30313

The basics

Rooted in the history of Atlanta, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights celebrates the city’s legacy as the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement and of Martin Luther King, Jr. Drawing a connection between that historical movement and current work to advance human rights, the institution offers a rich program of exhibitions, events, and initiatives.

Its “Rolls Down Like Water” gallery focuses on the history of the Civil Rights Movement, from Jim Crow to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, while its “Spark of Conviction” exhibition covers the ongoing global fight for human rights. One of its highlights is the “Voice to the Voiceless” gallery, which displays items from the Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection at Morehouse College.

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Things to know before you go

  • It’s strongly recommended by the museum to book your tickets before visiting to guarantee your admission.
  • The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is accessible to disabled visitors and meets all ADA requirements.
  • The museum is included in Atlanta’s CityPASS program, alongside many of the city’s most popular attractions.
  • Food and drink are not permitted at the museum.
  • There is no coat check at the museum; it’s advised to avoid bringing luggage or large bags.
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How to get there

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is located on Pemberton Place in Downtown Atlanta, adjacent to the Georgia Aquarium and Coca-Cola World. If using public transportation, access the museum via the Civic Center or Peachtree Center MARTA stations, or take the Atlanta Streetcar to the Centennial Olympic Park stop. If driving, the museum is located just off I-75/85.

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Trip ideas


When to get there

The museum is open every day except Monday. On weekdays and Sundays, it’s open from midday until early evening; on Saturdays, it’s open from morning until early evening. Last entry is 1 hour prior to closing time. The museum is at its busiest during the summer and school holidays; visit during the week for a quieter experience.

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Atlanta’s Civil Rights landmarks

After exploring the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, continue to learn more about Atlanta’s role in the Civil Rights Movement at pivotal landmarks like the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Park (including his birth home); the Ebenezer Baptist Church (where King once preached); the International Civil Rights Walk of Fame; and the Herndon Home Museum.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to National Center for Civil and Human Rights?
A:
Attractions near National Center for Civil and Human Rights:
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Atlanta?
A:
As well as visiting the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: